Tag Archives: Shelf Ready Packaging

Henderson's Relish old v new

How to use Packaging to Grow Sales – Henderson’s Relish

Henderson’s Relish is a dark, spicy table sauce which has been produced in Sheffield since 1885.  Although much loved in its home city, up until a few years ago it could only be found on sale in Sheffield and North Derbyshire.  Thanks to a business expansion programme, which included moving to a new factory in 2013, availability has now increased to the rest of Yorkshire and beyond.  Improvements to their packaging have played an important part in this.  Below I explain how the company has made the most of new branding and label layout, a bespoke glass bottle and the introduction of shelf-ready packaging. If you are interested in how to increase distribution and sales of your product using packaging, read on (Disclaimer: I have not worked on this, I just think they have done a really good job!  Please get in touch or call me on 07826 791 045 if you want help with your packaging development though).

 

1. Graphic Design and Label

Old Henderson’s label wrap-around

 

New Henderson’s label wrap-round. It makes more use of the space available than the old version

To most Sheffielders, the sight of a clear half-pint bottle filled with a dark brown liquid and with a bright orange label is unmistakably Henderson’s Relish.  Until their rebrand in 2015 the label design had remained pretty much unchanged for decades.  There was no logo as such – the bottle pretty much being its own logo and the type was simple capitals, reminiscent of old-style letterpress printing.  All pack information, including awards and the barcode, was visible on a single face.   The result was that it looked rather cluttered – OK if the product is on sale in a local butchers, but far from ideal for supermarkets and convenience stores, where the packaging needs to do the selling. 

For the new design, they have introduced a Victorian style font, sticking with uppercase letters.  The strokes of the letter Rs extend below the baseline, turning the product name into a logo.  The white Yorkshire rose now sits above the text, showing the brand’s provenance, white highlights on the lettering complement the rose.  Founder Harry Henderson’s signature has been added  to the base of the label and a subtle background texture breaks up the solid orange background.

The layout of the label is much neater.  Although shorter, it has been made bigger so it  wraps further around the bottle, and front and side panels have been introduced.  The barcode, accolades and newly added nutritional information are now hidden on the sides of the bottle rather than the front, creating a much neater appearance. 

 

2. Bottle

Embossing on the shoulder of the new Henderson’s bottle

Even the base is branded on the new Henderson’s bespoke glass bottle

Although Henderson’s used bespoke embossed bottles in their early days, more recently they had been using a generic half-pint bottle.  They returned to their roots in 2017 with a bottle produced by nearby leading glass manufacturer Beatson Clarke.  ‘Henderson’s Relish’ is now proudly positioned in relief on the shoulder and even the base.  This gives a real feel of class – in order to have bespoke bottles for your brand, there is a significant minimum order quantity and the associated tooling costs.  To someone who has not come across the brand before, this says ‘we are here, we are reliable and we are going to be around for a long time’. 

The glass itself is 30% recycled, 10% is from locally recycled glass – a great story which reinforces their Made-in-Yorkshire credentials.

 

3. Shelf-Ready Packaging

Hendersons SRP

Along with other requirements, major retailers will often not list a product unless the outer packaging meets their specifications.  They will have strict guidelines on the type of packaging and how it is labelled and palletised.  It is common for them to insist on shelf ready packaging (SRP or RRP), outer packaging that can be opened quickly and place directly on the supermarket shelf without the need for decanting.  Originally in an ordinary brown cardboard box with cardboard dividers to protect the bottles (like a crate of wine), the dividers have been done away with and the top portion of the box is easily ripped away to reveal the contents inside.  This SRP is printed in Hendo’s Orange, and they’ve jumped on the opportunity to add serving ideas and their gluten-free and vegetarian credentials to the part of the packaging which stays on the supermarket shelf, turning it into a valuable marketing tool. 

 

So what next for Henderson’s ?

Combined, the above changes have transformed a very ordinary-looking local hero into a product that looks worthy of any upmarket supermarket or farm-shop shelf.  Over the period that most of these changes were introduced, sales increased by 30% (Sheffield Star, October 2016). Clearly this hasn’t been entirely down to the packaging, for example Henderson’s are very good at taking advantage of publicity opportunities, Hendogate, for example, and futher establishing the brand by producing special editions.   When the new design was launched In 2015 their aspirations were just to conquer Yorkshire.  Now they have invested in a new bottling line and are planning to go global (Yorkshire Post 2017).  The changes to the packaging that have been made over the last few years have set them in excellent stead for this. 

 

To see how I can help your business grow using new packaging, check out the case studies and services provided pages on my website.  For more information, contact me here, call me on 07826 791 045 or subscribe to my monthly newsletter

Private Label or Retailer Own Brand Packaging

Retailer Own Brand – What You Need to Know About Packaging

If your company plans to supply products into Retailer Own Brand (or Private Label) and you are responsible for packaging, then this blog is for you.  Below is an essential check list of things you need to know, including what resource you will need, what to ask for from the retailer and what information you can expect them to ask you for.   (If you are looking to supply your own branded products subscribe to my mailing list to be notified when my next blog comes out).

 

Resource

Retailers work to very strict timescales so it is vital that you have enough resource to cover the work during the period to the launch date. There needs to be someone available to look after packaging sourcing and specification, e.g. a Packaging Technologist and also to manage the artwork process, an Artwork Co-ordinator.  Depending on your set-up, these roles can be done separately or combined into one position.  (If you do need extra resource – read this case study to see how I can help you). 

Retailers usually require a 48 hour turnaround on artworks, 24 hours on amends.  As several people within your business could be needed to check the artwork for accuracy– typically Technical, Product Development and the Packaging Technologist, it is vital that they, or a deputy, are made available to check artwork in order to keep to the project timescales.

 

What to ask for from the retailer;

Packaging Guidelines

Many of the large retailers publish packaging guidelines on their supplier web-portals, for which you will need a login and password.  These could include guidance on material grades, shelf-ready and transit packaging and an approved packaging supplier list.  I’m a big believer in continuing with your existing suppliers (see How to find a packaging supplier) but don’t dismiss the suppliers from the approved list straight away, the retailer might be able to get you a good deal. 

 

Login to the Artwork Approval System

You will need a separate login to their artwork management portal and the contact details for the artwork account manager – artwork management is usually sub-contracted to a specialist company.  It’s a good idea to put them in your speed dial – you‘ll be in contact with them a lot!

 

The Critical Path

Once you’ve supplied your FTP date (See below) You’ll be issued with a number of key dates that need to be met to keep the project on track, including pack copy submission dates and when the artwork is due to be issued for approval, etc.  The key dates could be at odds with your company’s product development timings, especially if you use a gated product development process. This is something you will just have to find ways to work around.  My experience of 6 years of working on ROB was that the two processes never matched!

 

 

What the retailer will ask for from you;

Mock-ups

If this is a completely new product, then you will be asked to provide an unprinted mock-up, including all packaging components.

 

Cutter Guide (primary pack)

This is the line drawing that either you or your printer have issued to have the artwork added onto.  It should show the position and orientation of panels, position and size of the BB area, etc. Chances are you might still be developing the packaging at the time the cutter guide is requested – this is where your artwork account manager comes in – they might be able to buy you a little time or allow you to submit a provisional cutter guide – it is really important to keep on top of this though, I’ve seen someone (not me!) lose track of this which cost a lot of money to fix.

 

Printer Details and a File To Printer (FTP) date

Your printer will be included in the artwork approval process and artwork will be sent to them directly once the artwork is signed-off.  You provide the FTP date working back from when you need the packaging on site, the printer’s lead times and a bit of wriggle room, etc.

 

Pack Copy

Your technical and NPD team will supply this through the retailer’s specification portal.  Artwork timings depend on these being supplied at the right time, so it is worth keeping in close contact with them on this.

 

Simple Packaging Specs and Recycling Information

Retailers vary enormously in the amount of information required. E.g. for outer cases, some are happy with ‘B-flute SRP’, others ask for the full spec!  It helps to have this information ready at your fingertips.  You could be asked to provide the OPRL labelling information for your lines (ask the packaging team at your retailer if you don’t have a copy of the OPRL guidelines).

 

New Line Form Information

Case count (number of products per case), size of outer case in mm, number of cases per pallet, number of cases per layer, and number of layers, weight per case and height of pallet.  These are usually required early on, so if the product is still in development stress that the values are provisional and UPDATE your sales manager (or whoever is responsible for filling in the new line forms) as soon as you can. 

 

The above just touches on what you need, but hopefully I’ve given you an insight into what is required from a packaging perspective when you start supplying your product into Retailer Own Brand.  There is a lot to consider, but as long as long as you stick to the checklist above, you’ll be winning.

Good Luck!

 

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Cheers,

Sarah